Madhukar Pai

PLOS Tuberculosis Channel launched

The Channel features articles on all topics relevant to TB research and aims to showcase the most up-to-date research to assist various stakeholders in the fight against TB.

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Regardless of the WHO snafu, TB should be a priority in the global AMR response

On 27 February, the WHO published a list of antibiotic-resistant "priority pathogens." The first of its kind, this list is intended to promote research, discovery and development (R&D) of new antibiotics, as part of WHO’s efforts to address the threat of antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and respond to an urgent public health need.  The hope is that the list will catalyse governments to incentivize basic science and advanced R&D.

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In India, eliminating TB isn't just a health issue — it's an economic one

Last month, India’s finance minister announced the government’s plan to eliminate tuberculosis by 2025 during the unveiling of the country’s Union Budget for 2017-2018. This is a welcome move: While ridding people of the burden of any disease is a worthy goal by itself, TB elimination provides perhaps one of the strongest economic cases for public intervention.

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'Cascade of care' can help India plug gaps in TB treatment

Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading infectious cause of death globally. In 2015, WHO estimated that there were 10.4 million new TB cases worldwide. Six countries accounted for 60 per cent of the total burden, with India accounting for 27 per cent of the global cases. The WHO highlighted that about 4.3 million TB patients globally are "missed" by health systems annually and remain either untreated or unreported to national governments, which may undermine global efforts to combat TB. India alone has more than one million of these missing TB patients every year.

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What India needs to do to win the fight against TB

The way forward is to invest in TB control, take public health benefits – free drugs and testing – to the unknown number of privately-treated patients.

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Implementation failures are threatening our plans to end the TB epidemic

It is a matter of great tragedy that tuberculosis (TB), despite being a curable infectious disease, continues to kill over 1.5 million people every year. Nearly 9.5 million new cases of TB occur worldwide every year. Of these, nearly 3 million TB patients are considered "missing" -- they are either not diagnosed, or not reported to TB control programs.

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How drug-resistant TB can show the path to tackling antimicrobial resistance

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global health threat, and it is estimated that by 2050, 10 million lives a year and a cumulative US$100 trillion of economic output are at risk due to the rise of drug-resistant infections, if we do not find solutions to tackle the problem.

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TB elimination: India can lead the way

June 8, 2016 - As the Prime Minister of India speaks to the US Congress this week, a neglected epidemic threatens India's progress. It's not Ebola or Zika - but rather tuberculosis, an ancient disease that silently kills one Indian every 90 seconds. In one year's time, TB will sicken over 2.2 million Indians, and kill 300,000. Between 2006 and 2014, TB cost the Indian economy a staggering $340 billion. Because TB strikes people in the prime of their lives, it's the 3rd leading cause of healthy years of life lost.

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Providing affordable diagnosis to solve India's TB epidemic

In 2014, for the first time ever, tuberculosis (TB) caused more deaths worldwide than HIV/AIDS making TB the world’s biggest infectious disease killer. TB killed 1.5 million people in 2014, ahead of HIV/AIDS, which was responsible for 1.2 million deaths in the same year. The WHO Global TB Report also revealed that India continues to be the country with the highest TB burden with nearly one-fourth of the global burden.

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Antimicrobial resistance and the growing threat of drug-resistant tuberculosis

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is a global health emergency, and experts are concerned that the end of the age of antimicrobials is imminent [1], [2], [3], [4], [5] and [6]. Since the introduction of antimicrobials nearly a century ago, microbes have evolved a variety of methods to resist these drugs. Today, the world is dealing with ‘superbugs’ that are virtually untreatable, including drug-resistant gonorrhea, carbapenem-resistant enterobacteriaceae, Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, and extended-spectrum-beta-lactamase producing strains [5]. The antibiotic pipeline is running dry, and AMR is threatening to undo major gains made in the control of infectious diseases. Models suggest that 300 million people are expected to die prematurely because of AMR over the next 35 years and the world’s GDP will be 2–3.5% lower than it otherwise would be in 2050 [6]. This translates into a loss of 60–100 trillion USD worth of economic output by 2050.

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